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National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2010

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week is coming up next month, October 24-30, 2010. I didn’t know. It wasn’t obvious. In fact, you may consider it one of the government’s best kept secrets, although they shouldn’t be keeping it a secret at all. I had to specifically Google “National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, 2010” to find it. I think that this is a terrific idea. However, the concept falls short in their advertising. The EPA’s website has one paragraph regarding the Week and links to the CDC and HUD. The government expects you to download their poster and post it! The links to CDC and HUD don’t even mention the National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week.

Considering the purpose of the Week is to “educate parents and children about the dangerous health effects of lead exposure,” the government is definitely missing its target audience. The thing is having a week to make people aware that lead poisoning is still an ongoing problem in the United States is a good idea. Approximately 250,000 children ages 1-5 have elevated blood lead levels in the United States today. Elevated blood lead levels can lead to stomach ache, poor appetite, and irritability which is often confused with other illnesses. Higher levels of lead exposure have been linked to ADHD. Very severe lead exposure (blood lead levels greater than 80 ug/dL) can cause neurological damage, convulsions, coma, and even death. The long-term effects of elevated blood lead levels in children often includes slow development, reduced IQ, learning disabilities, hearing loss, reduced height and hyperactivity. The effects of lead based paint exposure are permanent.

Simple measures can be taken to help prevent childhood lead poisoning. These include keeping the home clean, eating a good diet, and washing hands. Adults can check the home for potential danger areas, looking for flaking paint, crumbling plaster, indoor dust and outdoor dirt that may have lead in it. A lead inspection or lead based paint risk assessment can be performed by a certified professional to find out where lead and potential problems may be. Any peeling paint should be addressed and the paint chips cleaned with a wet disposable cloth (paper towel). Children should not be present when cleaning up paint chips. Dust should be kept to a minimum by damp mopping and using a wet cloth to clean walls, window sills, and other surfaces. Children’s toys should also be cleaned to eliminate the potential for lead dust to collect on the toys and then have the child put the toy in their mouth.

I wouldn’t be following due diligence if I didn’t give you a link to the EPA regarding the National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week! Here it is:

http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppw2010.htm

Please also check with your local county health department to see what they are doing for National Lead Poisoning Prevent Week.2010 National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

 

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